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High School Curriculum

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  • Career, Technical, & Agricultural Education

    Forestry/Natural Resources Management

    The agricultural education pathway is built on the three core areas of classroom/laboratory instruction, supervised agricultural experience programs and FFA student organization activities/opportunities.  Students enrolled in this pathway will receive instruction in and about establishing forests, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, measuring, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest while utilizes a “learning by doing” philosophy.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Basic Ag Science

    02.471

    AFNR-BAS

    Level 2 Forest Science

    03.451

    AFNR-FS-1

    Level 3 Natural Resources Management

    03.411

    AFNR-NRM-1

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Plant and Floral Design Systems

    The agricultural education pathway is built on the three core areas of classroom/laboratory instruction, supervised agricultural experience programs and FFA student organization activities/opportunities.  Students enrolled in this pathway will receive instruction in and about establishing forests, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, measuring, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest while utilizes a “learning by doing” philosophy.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Basic Ag Science

    02.47100

    AFNR-BAS

    Level 2 General Horticulture and Plant Science

    01.46100

    AFNR-GHPS

    Level 3 Floral Design  and Management

    01.46600

    AFNR-FDM

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Plant and Landscape Systems

    The agricultural education pathway is built on the three core areas of classroom/laboratory instruction, supervised agricultural experience programs and FFA student organization activities/opportunities.  Students enrolled in this pathway will receive instruction in and about establishing forests, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, measuring, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest while utilizes a “learning by doing” philosophy.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Basic Ag Science

    02.47100

    AFNR-BAS

    Level 2 General Horticulture

    01.46100

    AFNR-GHPS

    Level 3 Nursery & Landscape

    01.47000

    AFNR-NL

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Architectural Drafting Pathway

    The Architecture and Construction pathways offer hands-on projects, lab experiences and challenging classroom curriculum that includes relevant math, communications, and technical courses that enable students to gain technical and academic skills that simulate the business or industry work environment for their area of interest, such as drafting, plumbing, carpentry, masonry or electrical.  In addition to the classroom and laboratory experiences, students participate in SkillsUSA, a co-curricular student organization that promotes leadership skills as well as high standards of craft quality, scholarship, and safety.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Drafting and Design

    48.54100

    AC-IDD

    Level 2 Architectural Drawing and Design I

    48.54500

    AC-ADDI

    Level 3 Architectural Drawing and Design II

    48.54600

    AC-ADDII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Carpentry Pathway

    The Architecture and Construction pathways offer hands-on projects, lab experiences and challenging classroom curriculum that includes relevant math, communications, and technical courses that enable students to gain technical and academic skills that simulate the business or industry work environment for their area of interest, such as drafting, plumbing, carpentry, masonry or electrical.  In addition to the classroom and laboratory experiences, students participate in SkillsUSA, a co-curricular student organization that promotes leadership skills as well as high standards of craft quality, scholarship, and safety.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Industry Fundamentals and Occupational Safety

    46.54500

    AC-IFOS

    Level 2 Introduction to Construction

    46.54600

    AC-IC

    Level 3 Carpentry I

    46.55000

    AC-C1

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Electrical Pathway

    The Architecture and Construction pathways offer hands-on projects, lab experiences and challenging classroom curriculum that includes relevant math, communications, and technical courses that enable students to gain technical and academic skills that simulate the business or industry work environment for their area of interest, such as drafting, plumbing, carpentry, masonry or electrical.  In addition to the classroom and laboratory experiences, students participate in SkillsUSA, a co-curricular student organization that promotes leadership skills as well as high standards of craft quality, scholarship, and safety.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Industry Fundamentals and Occupational Safety

    46.54500

    AC-IFOS

    Level 2 Introduction to Construction

    46.54600

    AC-IC

    Level 3 Electrical I

    46.56000

    AC-E1

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Masonry Pathway

    The Architecture and Construction pathways offer hands-on projects, lab experiences and challenging classroom curriculum that includes relevant math, communications, and technical courses that enable students to gain technical and academic skills that simulate the business or industry work environment for their area of interest, such as drafting, plumbing, carpentry, masonry or electrical.  In addition to the classroom and laboratory experiences, students participate in SkillsUSA, a co-curricular student organization that promotes leadership skills as well as high standards of craft quality, scholarship, and safety.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Industry Fundamentals and Occupational Safety

    46.54500

    AC-IFOS

    Level 2 Introduction to Construction

    46.54600

    AC-IC

    Level 3 Masonry I

    46.57000

    AC-M1

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Plumbing Pathway

    The Architecture and Construction pathways offer hands-on projects, lab experiences and challenging classroom curriculum that includes relevant math, communications, and technical courses that enable students to gain technical and academic skills that simulate the business or industry work environment for their area of interest, such as drafting, plumbing, carpentry, masonry or electrical.  In addition to the classroom and laboratory experiences, students participate in SkillsUSA, a co-curricular student organization that promotes leadership skills as well as high standards of craft quality, scholarship, and safety.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Industry Fundamentals and Occupational Safety

    46.54500

    AC-IFOS

    Level 2 Introduction to Construction

    46.54600

    AC-IC

    Level 3 Plumbing I

    46.58000

    AC-P1

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Audio/Video Technology and Film Pathway

    In the Audio/Video Technology and Film Pathway you learn studio and field production for video and television. Through hands-on experience with cutting edge digital equipment, students create video projects and edit in linear and non-linear suites. Students apply theoretical concepts while planning and designing programs, capturing, editing and post-producing shows in the studio and the field.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Audio Video Technology and Film I

    10.51810

    AAVTC-AVTFI

    Level 2 Audio Video Technology and Film II

    10.51910

    AAVTC-AVTFII

    Level 3 Audio Video Technology and Film III

    10.52010

    AAVTC-AVTFIII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Graphics Communications Pathway

    Graphic Communications is defined as the processes and industries that create, develop, produce, and disseminate products utilizing or incorporating words or pictorial images to convey information, ideas, and feelings. Graphic Communications includes the family of market segments embracing the technologies of printing, publishing, packaging, electronic imaging, and their allied industries.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Graphics and Design

    48.56100

    AAVTC-IGD

    Level 2 Graphic Design and Production

    48.56200

    AAVTC-GDP

    Level 3 Advanced Graphic Output Processes

    48.57000

    AAVTC-AGOP

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Graphics Design Pathway

    Graphic design is the process of communicating visually using typography and images to present information. Graphic design practice embraces a range of cognitive skills, aesthetics, and crafts, including typography, visual arts, and page layout. Like other forms of design, graphic design often refers to both the process (designing) by which the communication is created and the products (designs) which are generated.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Graphics and Design

    48.56100

    AAVTC-IGD

    Level 2 Graphic Design and Production

    48.56200

    AAVTC-GDP

    Level 3 Advanced Graphic Design

    48.52800

    AAVTC-AGD

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Entrepreneurship

    This pathway is designed for those considering a career in business, especially small business.  Courses provide students with the skills needed to develop and manage independent small businesses. Includes instruction in business administration; enterprise planning and entrepreneurship; start-up; small business operations and problems; personnel supervision; capitalization and investment; taxation; business law and regulations; e-commerce; home business operations; and applications to specific sectors, products, and services.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Business & Technology

    07.44130

    BMA-IBT

    Level 2 Legal Environment of Business

    06.41500

    BMA-LEB

    Level 3 Entrepreneurship

    06.41600

    BMA-ENT

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Business & Technology
    The agricultural education pathway is built on the three core areas of classroom/laboratory instruction, supervised agricultural experience programs and FFA student organization activities/opportunities.  Students enrolled in this pathway will receive instruction in and about establishing forests, maintaining and surveying forests, identifying and protecting trees, measuring, mapping, preparing for timber sales and harvest while utilizes a “learning by doing” philosophy.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Business & Technology

    07.44130

    BMA-IBT

    Level 2 Business & Technology

    07.44100

    BMA-BT

    Level 3 Business Communications

    07.45100

    BMA-BC

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Human Resources Management

    Human resource management is a term used to describe a set of tasks aimed at effectively managing an organization’s employees (human resources). In this pathway student will learn about the business of managing people in an organization which includes compensation, benefits, training and development, staffing, strategic HR management and other functions.  In today’s competitive environment, human capital management is critically important to remain viable in the global marketplace. As a result, HR plays a pivotal role in the world—because people are truly the only thing that differentiates one business from another.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Business & Technology

    07.44130

    BMA-IBT

    Level 2 Legal Environment of Business

    06.41500

    BMA-LEB

    Level 3 Human Resources Principles

    06.41800

    BMA-HRP

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Teaching as a Profession

    This pathway includes broad introductory coverage of teaching as a profession, public school organization, planning and delivery of instruction, creation and maintenance of learning environment, standards, teaching and learning in multicultural settings, mainstream education of students with exceptionalities, “at risk” students, family and community partnerships, school law, and educational philosophies.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Examining the Teaching Profession

    13.01100

    ET-ETP

    Level 2 Contemporary Issues in Education

    13.01200

    ET-CIE

    Level 3 Teaching as a Profession Practicum

    13.01300

    ET-TAPP

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Early Childhood Care & Education I

    Students in this pathway are introduced to teaching in diverse and inclusive environments, including homes, schools, and other community settings, which serve children from birth to age 8 and their families. Child-centered and culturally sensitive practices are emphasized throughout the pathway, focusing on the need for multiple methods of instruction to accommodate a broad range of learners.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Early  Childhood Education I

    20.52810

    ET-ECE

    Level 2 Early Childhood Education II

    20.42400

    ET-ECEII

    Level 3 Early Childhood Education III

    20.42500

    ET-ECEIII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Energy Systems

    This pathway will introduce students to energy systems technologies.  Students will understand mechanical, electrical, fluid, and alternate systems.   Students will also identify and understand energy resources.  This pathway will cover the codes, regulations, and industry standards that are currently in place for sustainable energy buildings and Green Buildings.  Evaluation of a building style and the energy efficient materials used in its construction will be included.  Students will develop an awareness of the energy crisis and the use of alternative energy.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Foundations of Energy Technologies

    49.53700

    ENRG-FET

    Level 2 Energy and Power Technology

    21.45100

    ENRG-EPT

    Level 3 Appropriate and Alternative Energy Technologies

    21.45700

    ENRG-AAET

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Energy and Power:  Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    The Energy and Power: Generation, Transmission, and Distribution pathway allows students to learn the key concepts and methods of energy systems, applications and efficiency. Students will also explore how energy is converted into useful services and the role of increased efficiency in providing those services with less energy. The different forms of efficiency improvements and conservation are introduced, drawing upon examples in transportation, buildings, and industry. The practical implications of public policies, behavior, and economics are interspersed with technical and theoretical aspects. Key concepts include how to convert and design efficient energy systems.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Foundations of Energy Technologies

    49.53700

    ENRG-FET

    Level 2 Energy and Power:  Generation, Transmission, Distribution

    49.53800

    ENGR-EPGTD

    Level 3 Energy Systems Applications

    49.53900

    ENGR-ESA

     

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Business Accounting

    This pathway exposes student to the profession of accounting and related business functions. Includes instruction in accounting principles and theory, financial accounting, managerial accounting, cost accounting, budget control, tax accounting, legal aspects of accounting, auditing, reporting procedures, statement analysis, planning and consulting, business information systems, accounting research methods, professional standards and ethics, and applications to specific for-profit, public, and non-profit organizations.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction To Business & Technology

    07.44130

    FIN-IBT

    Level 2 Financial Literacy

    07.42600

    FIN-FL

    Level 3 Principles of Accounting I

    07.41100

    FIN-PA1

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Financial Services

    This pathway prepares students to plan, manage, and analyze the financial and monetary aspects and performance of business enterprises, banking institutions, or other organizations. Includes instruction in financial instruments; capital planning; funds acquisition; asset and debt management; budgeting; financial analysis; and investments and portfolio management.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Business & Technology

    07.44130

    FIN-IBT

    Level 2 Financial Literacy

    07.42600

    FIN-FL

    Level 3 Banking, Investing, and Insurance

    07.43100

    FIN-BII-1

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    JROTC – Air Force

    The AFJROTC program is a 4-year program that teaches students Aerospace Science, leadership, and citizenship skills. Each year is divided into two categories: academics and leadership. Academic studies include aviation history, science of flight, astronomy and private pilot training. Leadership studies include Air Force customs and courtesies, cadet corps activities, study habits, time management, communication skills and leadership and management studies. All students are expected to wear the uniform (issued free) once a week. Students are expected to participate in field training activities and community/school service projects.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Level 1 Aerospace Science Leadership 100

    28.01100

    Level 2 Aerospace Science Leadership 200

    28.01200

    Level 3 Aerospace Science: Cultural Studies

    28.01300

    Level 4 Aerospace Science: Leadership 300

    28.01400

    Level 5 Aerospace Science: Space Exploration

    28.01500

    Level 6 Aerospace Science: Leadership 400

    28.01600 

    Level 7 Aerospace Science: Aviation History

    28.01700

    Level 8 Aerospace Science: Survival

    28.01800

    Level 9 Aerospace Science: Honors Ground School

    28.01900

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    JROTC – Army

    The mission of the United States Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) Program is to motivate young people to be better citizens.  The program is offered as an academic elective and the grade received is included in the student’s overall grade point average.  Program objectives are to:  provide and encourage citizenship; promote high school completion; develop leadership potential; strengthen self-esteem; improve wellness and physical fitness; provide an incentive to live drug-free; and enhance life skills.

    Major subject areas in the JROTC curriculum are: Leadership and Patriotism (decision making, problem-solving, teamwork, moral responsibility, respect for constituted authority, personal and group success), Communication  (communicate and listen effectively, improve verbal and written skills, interview and presentation methods),  Citizenship and History (ethical values, rights and responsibilities, role of military in a democracy, current events, importance of citizenship in American History), Life Management Skills (self-reliance, goal setting, time management, financial management, stress reduction, increase self-confidence, overcome fear of failure, career options and opportunities), Wellness and Physical Fitness (first aid training, good health and appearance, drug prevention, importance of diet and exercise).  No military obligation is incurred by participation in the program, though all students are expected to wear the uniform (issued free) once a week. Students are expected to participate in field training activities and community/school service projects. Successful graduates of this program can earn scholarships to a college or university. Entry-level active military pay is increased if a student has had at least two years of high school ROTC.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Level 1 JROTC Army Leadership 1

    28.03100

    Level 2 JROTC Army Leadership 2

    28.03200

    Level 3 JROTC Army Leadership 3

    28.03300

    Level 4 JROTC Army Leadership 4

    28.03400

    Level 5 JROTC Army Leadership 5

    28.03500

    Level 6 JROTC Army Leadership 6

    28.03600

    Level 7 JROTC Army Leadership 7

    28.03700

    Level 8 JROTC Army Leadership 8

    28.03800

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    JROTC – Navy

    The Navy JROTC (NJROTC) curriculum emphasizes citizenship and leadership development, as well as maritime heritage, the significance of sea power, and naval topics such as the fundamentals of naval operations, seamanship, navigation and meteorology. Classroom instruction is augmented throughout the year by community service activities, drill competition, field meets, visits to naval activities, marksmanship training, and other military training.

    Students will:

    • Develop an appreciation of the ethical values and principles that underlie good citizenship which include integrity, responsibility and respect.
    • Expand the ability to think logically and to communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
    • Develop a better understanding of ‘patriotism” and what it means to be an American.
    • Become more informed about the importance of first aid, physical conditioning, proper diet and nutrition.
    • Engage in activities that foster pride, self-respect, confidence, serf-discipline and the desire to do one’s best.

    No military obligation is incurred by participation in the program, though all students are expected to wear the uniform (issued free) once a week. Students are expected to participate in field training activities and community/school service projects. Successful graduates of this program can earn scholarships to a college or university. Entry-level active military pay is increased if a student has had at least two years of high school ROTC.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Naval Science I Cadet Field Manual

    28.02100

    Level 2 Naval Science I Introduction to NJROTC

    28.02200

    Level 3 Naval Science II Maritime History

    28.02300

    Level 4 Naval Science II Nautical Science

    28.02400

    Level 5 Naval Science III Naval Knowledge

    28.02500

    Level 6 Naval Science III Naval Orientation and Skills

    28.02600

    Level 7 Naval Science IV Naval Leadership and Ethics

    28.02700

    Level 8 Naval Science IV Effective Communications

    28.02800

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion. 

    Therapeutic Services /Allied Health and Medicine

    Students wishing to pursue a career in the area of Therapeutic Services will receive initial exposure to the fundamental principles, practices, and essential skills used Allied Health and Medicine. This pathway includes both classroom instruction and hands-on laboratory experiences in the development of skills required Allied Health and Medicine.  Areas of study include career planning, legal and professional ethics, medical terminology, documentation, communication skills, human relations, medical asepsis/infection control, vital signs, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and first aid.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Healthcare Science

    25.52100

    HS-HIS

    Level 2 Essentials of Healthcare

    25.44000

    HS-EHS

    Level 3 Allied Health and Medicine

    25.43700

    HS-AHM

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Therapeutic Services/Sports Medicine

    The Sports Medicine pathway will help students develop skills that will give them a competitive edge in the fields of physical therapy or sports medicine. This program covers medical terminology, nutrition, kinesiology, gait training, therapeutic exercise, pharmacology, and modality and treatment techniques in physical medicine training.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Healthcare Science

    25.52100

    HS-IHS

    Level 2 Essentials of Healthcare

    25.44000

    HS-EHS

    Level 3 Sports Medicine

    25.44600

    HS-SM

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Therapeutic Services/Dental Science

    This pathway is designed for students wishing to pursue a career in the area of Dental Science.  Students will receive initial exposure to dental health science technical skills and attitudes applicable to dental health occupations.

     

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Healthcare Science

    25.52100

    HS-IHS

    Level 2 Essentials of Dental Science

    25.48800

    HS-EDS

    Level 3 Dental Science II

    25.48900

    HS-DSII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Diagnostics/Clinical Lab

    Students wishing to pursue a career in the area of Diagnostics/Clinical Lab will receive initial exposure to the fundamental principles, practices, and essential skills used in diagnostic services. This pathway includes both classroom instruction and hands-on laboratory experiences in the development of skills required in Diagnostics/Clinical Lab.  Areas of study include career planning, legal and professional ethics, microbiology, analytical chemistry and quality control procedures.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Healthcare Science

    25.52100

    HS-IHS

    Level 2 Essentials of Healthcare

    25.44000

    HS-EHS

    Level 3 Clinical Lab I

    25.57600

    HS-CLI

    Optional Level 4 Clinical Lab II

    25.57700

    HS-CLII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Therapeutic Services/Patient Care

    In this pathway medicolegal issues surrounding the management, storage, retrieval, and release of medical records are examined including new legal issues surrounding current electronic and imaging technology developments and trends in medical records management.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Healthcare Science

    25.52100

    HS-IHS

    Level 2 Essentials of Healthcare

    25.44000

    HS-EHS

    Level 3 Patient Care Fundamentals

    25.43600

    HS-PCF

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Culinary Arts

    The Culinary Arts pathway creates an awareness of opportunities within the vast areas of the Food Service Industry. This pathway incorporates developments in the areas of institutional food, fine dining and basic baking principals. Pathway completers will have a strong foundation in the basics of food preparation, safety, nutrition, and restaurant operating procedures.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Culinary Arts

    20.53100

    HOSP–ICA

    Level 2 Culinary Arts I

    20.53210

    HOSP-CAI

    Level 3 Culinary Arts II

    20.53310

    HOSP-CAII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Sports & Entertainment Marketing

    This pathway prepares students for versatile careers in sports and event marketing. Leading marketing organizations today are creating and managing their communications in an integrated manner, with coordination in terms of messages, positioning, and timing, all developed in support of overall organizational objectives. This pathway will help the student prepare for a key role in such organizations.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Marketing Principles

    08.47400

    MKT-MP

    Level 2 Introduction to Sports & Entertainment Marketing

    08.47800

    MKT-ISEM

    Level 3 Advanced Sports & Entertainment Marketing

    08.48500

    MKT-ASEM

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion. 

    Nutrition & Food Science

    This pathway includes broad introductory coverage the individual’s involvement in nutrition and food, factors involved in consumer food choices, in food selection, in food preparation, career opportunities in nutrition and food occupations, and commercial food preparation.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Food , Nutrition & Wellness

    20.41610

    HUM-FNW

    Level 2 Food for Life

    20.41400

    HUM-FL

    Level 3 Food Science

    20.41810

    HUM-FS

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Interior, Fashion and Textiles

    The Interior Design pathway is designed to expose students to a variety of opportunities in the field of both residential and non-residential interior design. The focus of the pathway is technical knowledge, professional practices, and aesthetic principles. Curriculum content includes residential and non-residential interior design, architectural drafting, computer-aided design, and universal design. Also included are basic design, history of interiors and furnishings, color theory, products, business practices, and graphic presentations.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Foundations of Interior Design

    20.44100

    HUM-FID

    Level 2 Fundamentals of Fashion

    20.44500

    HUM-FF

    Level 3 Textile Science

    20.44700

    HUM-TS

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Personal Care Services—Cosmetology

    This pathway introduces the cosmetology profession. Instruction is provided on the various methods of disinfection, sanitation, and safety used in the cosmetology industry. This pathway introduces various types of scalp treatments, hair and scalp structures, and hair disorders. Training is provided in a lab or classroom setting. Instruction is provided on the laws, rules and regulations and how they govern the cosmetology industry.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Personal Care Services

    12.54400

    HUM-IPCS

    Level 2 Cosmetology Services 2

    12.41000

    HUM-CSII

    Level 3 Cosmetology Services 3

    12.41100

    HUM-CSIII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Personal Care Services—Barbering

    This pathway introduces the Barbering profession.  Instruction is provided on the various methods of disinfection, sanitation, and safety used in the barbering industry. This pathway introduces individualized and precise designing, cutting, and shaping of the hair, to include mustache and beard designs, facials and scalp treatment. Training is provided in a lab or classroom setting. Instruction is provided on the laws, rules and regulations and how they govern the industry.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Personal Care Services

    12.54400

    HUM-IPCS

    Level 2 Barbering II

    12.42000

    HUM-BRII

    Level 3 Barbering III

    12.42100

    HUM-BRIII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Personal Care Services—Esthetics

    This pathway introduces the Esthetics profession.  Instruction is provided on the various methods of disinfection, sanitation, and safety used in the barbering industry. This pathway introduces individualized and precise designing, cutting, and shaping of the hair, to include mustache and beard designs, facials and scalp treatment. Training is provided in a lab or classroom setting. Instruction is provided on the laws, rules and regulations and how they govern the industry.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Personal Care Services

    12.54400

    HUM-IPCS

    Level 2 Esthetics Services II

    12.43000

    HUM-ESII

    Level 3 Esthetics Services III

    12.43100

    HUM-ESIII

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Personal Care Services—Nails

    This pathway introduces the Barbering profession.  Instruction is provided on the various methods of disinfection, sanitation, and safety used in the barbering industry. This pathway introduces individualized and precise designing, cutting, and shaping of the hair, to include mustache and beard designs, facials and scalp treatment. Training is provided in a lab or classroom setting. Instruction is provided on the laws, rules and regulations and how they govern the industry.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Personal Care Services

    12.54400

    HUM-IPCS

    Level 2 Nail Care Services II

    12.47000

    HUM-NCS II

    Level 3 Nail Care Services III

    12.47100

    HUM-NCS III

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion. 

    Computer Science

    This pathway focuses on the general writing and implementation of generic and customized programs to drive operating systems and  prepares students to apply the methods and procedures of software design and programming to software installation and maintenance. Includes instruction in software design, low- and high-level languages and program writing; program customization and linking; prototype testing; troubleshooting; and related aspects of operating systems and networks.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Digital Technology

    11.41500

    IT-IDT

    Level 2 Computer Science Principles

    11.47100

    IT-CSP

    Level 3 AP Computer Science

    11.01600

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Programming

    This pathway focuses on the general writing and implementation of generic and customized programs to drive operating systems and  prepares students to apply the methods and procedures of software design and programming to software installation and maintenance. Includes instruction in software design, low- and high-level languages and program writing; program customization and linking; prototype testing; troubleshooting; and related aspects of operating systems and networks.

     

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Digital Technology

    11.41500

    IT-IDT

    Level 2 Computer Science Principles

    11.47100

    IT-CS

    Level 3 Programming, Apps, Games, and Society

    11.47200

    IT-PGAS

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Web & Digital Design

    This pathway exposes students to the skills needed to develop and maintain web servers and the hosted web pages at one or a group of web sites, and to function as designated webmasters. Includes instruction in computer systems and networks; web page design and editing; information resources management; web policy and procedures; Internet applications of information systems security; user interfacing and usability research; and relevant management and communications skills.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Digital Technology

    11.41500

    IT-IDT

    Level 2 Digital Design

    11.45100

    IT-DD

    Level 3 Web Design

    11.45200

    IT-FWD

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Law Enforcement Services/Forensic Science

    This pathway includes, but is not limited to, introduction to the criminal justice system, police ethics and constitutional law, patrol procedures, traffic control procedures, defensive tactics and physical proficiency skills, interpersonal and communication skills, investigation procedures, court systems and trial procedures, correctional system, introduction to forensic science, crime prevention, property control, and employability skills.  .

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Intro to Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

    43.45000

    LPSCS-ILPSCS

    Level 2 Criminal Justice Essentials

    43.45100

    LPSCS-CJE

    Level 3 Forensic Science and Criminal Investigations

    43.45200

    LPSCS-FSCI

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Law Enforcement Services/Criminal Investigations

    This pathway includes, but is not limited to, introduction to the criminal justice system, police ethics and constitutional law, patrol procedures, traffic control procedures, defensive tactics and physical proficiency skills, interpersonal and communication skills, investigation procedures, court systems and trial procedures, correctional system, introduction to forensic science, crime prevention, property control, and employability skills.  .

     

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Intro to Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

    43.45000

    LPSCS-ILPSCS

    Level 2 Criminal Justice Essentials

    43.45100

    LPSCS-CJE

    Level 3 Criminal Investigations

    43.45300

    LPSCS-CI

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion. 

    Manufacturing

    This pathway provides students with an introduction to manufacturing technology and its relationship with society, individuals, and the environment.  This pathway also includes a study of the various managed activities which are used to develop, produce, use, and assess production technology. Research and development, production, and marketing techniques are reviewed. In addition, students learn about a wide variety of production techniques. Fabrication and assembly steps are highlighted. Assuring product quality is also explored.

     

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Foundations of Manufacturing and Materials Science

    21.44100

    ENGR-FMMS

    Level 2 Robotics and Automated Systems

    21.44500

    ENGR-RAS

    Level 3 Production Enterprises

    21.44400

    ENGR-PE

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Fashion, Merchandising and Retail Management

    In this pathway students will develop basic business skills with a focus in Fashion Merchandising and Retail Management.  The curriculum will focus on marketing, management, and general merchandising.  Students will hone their skills in the area of display and effective visual merchandising, retail buying, retail management, and merchandising and planning.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Marketing Principles

    08.47400

    MKT-MP

    Level 2 Fashion, Merchandising and Retailing Essentials

    08.42100

    MKT-FMRE

    Level 3 Advanced Fashion, Merchandising and Retailing

    08.42200

    MKT-AFMR

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Marketing and Management

    This pathway focuses on the decisions facing marketing managers as they attempt to harmonize the objectives and resources of the organization with the needs and opportunities in the marketplace.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Marketing Principles

    08.47400

    MKT-MP

    Level 2 Marketing and Entrepreneurship

    08.44100

    MKT-ME

    Level 3 Marketing Management

    08.44200

    MKT-MM

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Engineering and Technology

    This pathway is a sequence of courses which, when combined with traditional mathematics and science courses in high school, introduces students to the scope, rigor and discipline of engineering.  This pathway will introduce students to the field of engineering technology.  Students will solve problems using common engineering practices. Students will be acquainted with the major fields of engineering and with the diverse functions engineers and technologists perform. Students will be familiar with the paths and certifications that can lead to careers in engineering and engineering technology.  Students will understand and demonstrate communication skills necessary in the field of engineering. They will employ an individual and team approach while solving engineering problems.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Foundations of Engineering and Technology

    21.42500

    STEM-FET

    Level 2 Engineering Concepts

    21.47100

    STEM-EC

    Level 3 Engineering Applications

    21.47200

    STEM-EA

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Engineering Drafting and Design

    Drafting and design is the process of turning ideas of how things should be constructed into technical drawings.  These drawings are based on sketches and calculations made by engineers, surveyors, architects and/or scientists.  The drawings provide visual guidelines such as dimensions, materials to be used, and procedures to be followed to build everything from manufactured products such as spacecraft, automobiles, and industrial machinery to structures such as homes, office buildings, and oil and gas pipelines.

     

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Introduction to Drafting and Design

    48.54100

    AC-IDD

    Level 2 Survey of Engineering Graphics

    48.54200

    AC-SEG

    Level 3 3D Modeling and Analysis

    48.54300

    AC-3DMA

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Automobile  Maintenance and Light Repair

    This pathway includes classroom instruction and hands-on laboratory performance of the basic tasks included in the initial training required for employment in the automotive service field as identified by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). The courses include the development of basic technical skills required in steering and suspension, electrical and electronics, brakes, and engine performance.

    Level

    Course Name

    Course Code

    Course Abbreviation

    Level 1 Basic Maintenance and Light Repair

    47.53110

    TDL-BMLR

    Level 2 Maintenance and Light Repair 2

    47.53210

    TDL-MLR2

    Level 3 Maintenance and Light Repair 3

    47.53310

    TDL-MLR3

    *Levels 1, 2, and 3 are required for pathway completion.

    Work-Based Learning

    Work-Based Learning Programs are structured educational experiences that integrate classroom learning (school-based) with productive, structured work experiences (work-based), related to a student’s career goal.

    Key Components:

    • School-based learning
    • Work-based learning
    • Connecting activities
    • Work-Based Learning
    • Provides paid or unpaid work experience
    • Promotes a partnership between education and industry
    • Integrates academic and technical instruction

    Work-Based Learning provides an opportunity for juniors and seniors to start preparing for a career while still in high school. Individual programs of study in the freshman and sophomore years prepare students for a successful work-based learning experience.

    Through Work-Based Learning, students are able to earn wages while learning from skilled professionals, increase career options and future employability, strengthen academic skills, experience the connection between education and real-life work skills, earn post-secondary credit while in high school and experience potential careers in the workplace.

    Work-Based Learning enables employers to play an active role in shaping the quality of their future workforce.  Through Work-Based Learning, employers are able to increase skill levels of potential workers, work with educators to develop curriculum based on industry standards, recruit and screen potential employers, reduce turnover of entry-level employees through the hiring of Work-Based Learning graduates and improve competitiveness in the international marketplace.

    Middle School Business and Computer Science
    07.08300 Business and Computer Science (Grade 6)
    07.08400 Business and Computer Science (Grade 7)
    07.08500 Business and Computer Science (Grade 8)

    **Click here to view the Business and Computer Science Middle School Performance Standards.

    The goal of these courses is to provide all middle school students with an introduction to the principles of computer science, basic keyboarding skills, Internet safety and usage, and computer applications. Students will explore how personality traits and personal values align with career choices and will develop a career plan. Personal, professional, and ethical standards of behavior for the workplace will be examined and reinforced in the classroom. Development of leadership skills through participation in the career and technical student organization, FBLA, will provide students the opportunity to explore possible career pathways.

     

    Middle School Engineering and Technology
    21.02100 Exploring Engineering and Technology Grade 6
    21.02200 Invention and Innovation Grade 7
    21.02300 Technological Systems Grade 8

    **Click here to view the Engineering and Technology Middle School Performance Standards.

    The goal of these courses is to provide all students with an introduction to the principles of Engineering & Technology and its place in the modern world. Students will be introduced to the world of invention and innovation along with the Engineering Design Process. They will examine the impacts of invention and innovation on society and solve problems through research, design, and experimentation in one or more of the areas of Engineering and Technology. Students will utilize the universal systems model including input, process, output and feedback to examine various systems. Development of leadership skills through participation in the career and technical student organization, TSA, will provide students the opportunity to explore possible career pathways.

    Middle School Family and Consumer Science
    20.01100 Family and Consumer Science (Grade 6)
    20.01200 Family and Consumer Science (Grade 7)
    20.01300 Family and Consumer Science (Grade 8)

    **Click here to view the Family and Consumer Science Middle School Performance Standards.

    The goal of these courses is to provide all students with an introduction to the Family and Consumer Sciences Career Pathways. The FACS career pathways are Nutrition and Food Science, Consumer Services, Interior and Fashion Design, and Family, Community, and Global Leadership.  Education career pathways are Early Childhood Education and Teaching as a Profession and Culinary Arts is also a career pathway.  Students acquire fundamental knowledge and skills necessary for success in any of the career pathways.  Exposure to career possibilities in each area will allow students to successfully integrate their own interests into a career plan.  Development of leadership skills through participation in the career and technical student organization, FCCLA, will provide students the opportunity to explore possible career pathways.

    DECA
    Distributive Education Club of America is a student-centered, educational/professional organization with a program of leadership and career development designed specifically for students enrolled in marketing education. Marketing education prepares students for rewarding careers in marketing, management and entrepreneurship. DECA enhances that education by providing marketing-related activities based directly on classroom study.

    Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda
    Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda is a nonprofit education association of students preparing for careers in business and business-related fields.  The FBLA Mission is to bring business and education together in a positive working relationship through innovative leadership and career development programs.

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Inc. (FCCLA)
    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, Inc. (FCCLA) is a nonprofit national career and technical student organization for young men and women in family and consumer sciences education in public and private school through grade 12.

    FFA
    The FFA is a national organization dedicated to preparing members for leadership and careers in the science, business and technology of agriculture. Local, state and national activities and award programs provide opportunities to apply knowledge and skills acquired through agriculture education.

    HOSA
    HOSA is a national student organization endorsed by the U.S. Department of Education and the Health Science Technology Education Division of ACTE. HOSA’s two-fold mission is to promote career opportunities in the health care industry and to enhance the delivery of quality health care to all people. HOSA’s goal is to encourage all health occupations instructors and students to join and be actively involved in the HSTE-HOSA Partnership.

    SkillsUSA
    SkillsUSA is national organization that provides quality education experiences for students in leadership, teamwork, citizenship and character development. It builds and reinforces self-confidence, work attitudes and communications skills. It emphasizes total quality at work, high ethical standards, superior work skills, life-long education and pride in the dignity of work. SkillsUSA also promotes understanding of the free enterprise system and involvement in community service activities.

    Technology Student Association (TSA)
    Technology Student Association (TSA) is a national, non-profit organization for students with an interest in technology. TSA members learn problem-solving, decision-making, critical thinking and leadership skills as they relate to design, communications, power, energy, transportation, engineering, manufacturing, construction and biotechnology. TSA strives to meet the educational needs and challenges of all students in an increasingly and ever-changing technological world.

    Career and Technical Instruction (CTI)
    Career and Technical Instruction (CTI) provides students with disabilities the opportunity to successfully participate in career technology education programs. CTI also ensures delivery of appropriate services and accommodations for students that participate in career technology education programs.

    English Language Arts

    (23.02100) This course introduces the importance of myths and tales of classical mythology, focusing on a comparative study of plot, characters, themes, and figurative devices. The course emphasizes the following: critical and analytical skills, vocabulary development, a study of the influences of Greek, Roman, and Norse word origins on the English language, and composition. The study of the relationship between people and their societies is a major emphasis, along with the impact of mythology on the literary world. Writing exploration through media literacy and viewing will be a focus in this course.
    (23.02300) This course offers the skills students need to explore and study William Shakespeare’s life and works. Through a survey of selected Shakespearean plays, students learn to read text accurately and imaginatively and to appreciate Shakespeare’s dramatic dimensions. The plays are reviewed via a range of media: text, film, audio recording, and live performance. Students develop the ability to interpret literature and complex ideas, recognize, discuss, and write about universal themes in literature, compare and contrast characters, and become familiar with Elizabethan English. Critical writing skills as well as speaking skills are components of the coursework.
    (23.02400) This course focuses on the Old Testament as a literary and historical document which has greatly influenced the modern world. The course will familiarize students with contents of the Old Testament, the history recorded by the Old Testament, the literary style and structure of the Old Testament, the customs and cultures of the peoples and societies recorded in the Old Testament, and the influence of the Old Testament upon law, history, government, literature, art, music, customs, morals, values, and cultures. Topics may include historical background and events of the period; the history of the Kingdom of Israel; the poetry of the Old Testament; the influence of Old Testament history and literature on subsequent art, music, literature, law, and events, including recent and current events in the Middle East.
    (23.02500) This course focuses on the New Testament as a literary and historical document which has greatly influenced the modern world. The course will familiarize students with the contents of the New Testament, the history recorded by the New Testament, the literary style and structure of the New Testament, the customs and cultures of the peoples and societies recorded in the New Testament and the influence of the New Testament upon law, history, government, literature, art, music, customs, morals, values, and culture. The topics may include the historical background and events of the period; the life of Jesus of Nazareth; the parables of Jesus; the life and travels of Paul; and the influence of New Testament history and literature on subsequent art, music, literature, law, and events.
    (23.02600) This course introduces representative works by and about women from historical, social, and literary perspectives. The student learns how gender roles develop and change and how women’s views of themselves are reflected in their writing. The student reads different literary forms and identifies motifs, themes, and stereotypical patterns in that literature. Additionally, the student learns historical, philosophical, religious, and cultural information to help increase the understanding and appreciation of the works. By the end of the course, the student demonstrates knowledge of the texts, the authors and literary and social movements that produced them, and the elements of those texts, such as symbols, themes, and points of view. Critical writing skills as well as speaking skills are components of this course.
    (23.03100) This course offers opportunities for students to explore different writing genres: narrative, argument, and expository modes of discourse. The students will study different writers and their writing styles. The students will have opportunities to improve writing proficiency through a complete study of the components of solid writing: organization, fluency, style, diction, grammar and usage, imaginative expressions, and details. The course allows students to utilize the writing process to write independently to improve their ability to communicate effectively in writing.
    (23.03200) This course focuses on journalistic writing through analysis of newspapers, yearbooks, literary magazines, and broadcast journalism publications. A concentration on the following components of journalistic writing is critical: influence, purpose, structure, and diction. Reading, writing, and critical thinking are key components as students explore the power and influence of journalism. Students will participate in news gathering, the study of ethics, and the aspects of copy writing, editing, and revising. If a publication is produced, the students will learn the process of publishing.
    (23.03300) The course offers an advanced study of journalistic writing. Skills from Journalism I are continued; the students focus on a more intense analysis of print and broadcast publications. Students read extensively to explore and analyze the influence of good journalistic writing. This course requires more critical thinking and more in-depth writing.
    (23.03400) This course focuses on the writing process (planning, drafting, and revising). The students will focus on different writing genres and organizational structures: expository, argument, narrative, descriptive, comparison-contrast, exemplification, process analysis, classification, cause and effect, and definition. Advanced language skills (grammar and usage) will be a major component of this class. An emphasis on research is also required. THIS COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.03500) This course is an extension of Journalism I and II; the students will enhance and hone the skills in journalistic writing, with a main focus on analysis of print and broadcast publications. An in-depth coverage of level-two topics will serve as the main premise. Students will evaluate and apply skills appropriately and efficiently to various publication opportunities and activities.
    (23.03600) This course is designed for students who have mastered skills in Journalism III. The students will publish journalistic articles either in a school newspaper (print or electronic) or in the local newspaper. Research and interviews will be required when formulating ideas for writing. The range of opportunities to apply skills will be increased.
    (23.03700) Advanced Placement (AP) Research, ELA.
    (23.03800) Advanced Placement (AP) Seminar, ELA.
    (23.04100) This course focuses on the origin of the English language and traces its growth and changes through the present century. The students will explore the characteristics and literature of the Old English, Middle English, and Modern English periods. The students will study etymologies and dialects and how those two elements have influenced the language as a whole. Outside readings and research are required.
    (23.04200) This course focuses on developing public speaking skills. The students will identify effective methods to arrange ideas and information in written form and then convert the written form into an effective oral delivery. The course focuses on critically thinking, organizing ideas, researching counter viewpoints, and communicating appropriately for different audiences and purposes. The students analyze professional speeches to enhance their knowledge of solid speech writing.
    (23.04300) This course focuses on content, purpose, and audience as the guide for the students’ organization in writing. The course will enable students to become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. The students will compose for a variety of purposes with a clear understanding of writer’s purpose, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way conventions and resources of language contribute to writing effectiveness. Expository, analytical, and argumentative writings support the academic and professional communication required by colleges; personal and reflective writing support the development of writing facility in any context. Students will examine primary and secondary sources to synthesize materials for their writing. An AP syllabus will be submitted and approved by College Board.
    (23.04600) This course is a detailed study of forensic speaking including extemporaneous speaking, oration, and interpretation of literature, and debate. There is an emphasis on understanding various forensic speaking formats and the importance of applying reasoning, research, and delivery skills. Critical thinking is a major component of this course.
    This course is an extension of Speech/Forensic I. The course provides a review of the skills covered in the first course. The emphasis for this course is classical and contemporary theory. The students will understand the philosophical basis of argumentative theory. (23.04700)
    (23.04800) This course is designed for intensive training in directed research. Students will research various sources including, but not limited to, computer networks, legal journals, and government documents. Students will become aware of the complexity of social issues and public policy. Through this understanding, students will be able to formulate sound arguments and understand counterarguments. Speaking skills will be honed through practice and performance.
    (23.04900) This course is designed to provide students ample opportunities to improve the ability to present a persuasive position through speech. Persuasive speaking skills are refined by researching, effective presentation, and compelling articulation of persuasive ideas. The student will understand and appreciate the importance of public speaking, clear writing, sound debate, advertising, mass media, politics, and law. The key component will be to understand the role of advocacy in society.
    (23.05100) Only designated substitutions may be made for this course. This course focuses on the study of American literature and informational texts, writing modes and genres, and essential conventions for reading, writing, and speaking. The student develops an understanding of chronological context and the relevance of period structures in American literature. The students develop an understanding of the ways the period of literature affects its structure and how the chronology of a work affects its meaning. The students read a variety of informational and literary texts in all genres and modes of discourse. Reading across the curriculum develops students’ academic and personal interests in different subjects. While expository writing is the focus in American literature, the students will also demonstrate competency in argumentative and narrative genres. The students will engage in research, timed writing, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking. The students demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes. THIS COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.05200) This course focuses on the study of British literature and informational texts, writing modes and genres, and essential conventions for reading, writing, and speaking. The students develop an understanding of chronological context and the relevance of period structures in British literature. The students develop an understanding of the ways the period of literature affects its structure and how the chronology of a work affects its meaning. The students encounter a variety of informational and literary texts and read texts in all genres and modes of discourse. Reading across the curriculum develops the students’ academic and personal interests in different subjects. While the continued focus is expository writing in British literature, the student will also demonstrate competency in argumentative and narrative genres. The students will engage in research, the impact that technology has on writing, timed writing, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. The students demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listeningskills for a variety of purposes. THIS COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.05300) May substitute for 23.05100. This course focuses on the study of American literature and informational texts, embracing its rhetorical nature and recognizing the literature as a platform for argument. It also emphasizes a variety of writing modes and genres and the essential conventions of reading, writing, and speaking. The students will develop an understanding of how historical context in American literature affect its structure, meaning, and rhetorical stance. The course will enable students to become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. The students will encounter a variety of informational, literary, and non-print texts from across the curriculum and read texts in all genres and modes of discourse, as well as visual and graphic images. Instruction in language conventions and essential vocabulary will occur within the context of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The students will demonstrate an understanding of listening and speaking for a variety of purposes. This course will focus on the consideration of subject, occasion, audience, purpose, speaker, and tone as the guide for effective writing, as well as the way generic conventions and resources of language contribute to writing effectiveness. The students will compose a variety of writing, including expository, analytical, and argumentative writings which support the academic and professional communication required by colleges; and personal and reflective writings which support the development of writing facility in any context. The students will produce responses to timed writing assignments, as well as writing that proceeds through several stages or drafts, which include opportunities for revision guided by feedback from teacher and peers. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources and develop the research skills needed to effectively synthesize these sources for their writing. An AP syllabus must be submitted and approved by the College Board. (This literature module must be taught in the 11th grade and is recommended as a designated substitute for American Literature.) THIS COURSE MUST ALSO REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.06100) This course focuses on a study of literary genres and informational texts; the students develop initial understanding of both the structure and the meaning of a literary work. The students explore the effect of the literary form in regards to interpretation. The students will read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. The students will also demonstrate competency in a variety of writing genres: argumentative, expository, and narrative. The students will engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. The students demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes. THIS COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.06120) May substitute for 23.05100. Follow International Baccalaureate (Standard Level) curriculum.
    (23.06130) Follow International Baccalaureate (Higher Level) curriculum. May substitute for American Literature under IDA 2 only.
    (23.06200) This course focuses on a study of literary genres and informational texts; the student develops understanding that theme is what relates literature to life and that themes are recurring in the literary world. The students explore the effect of themes in regard to interpretation. The students will read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. While the focus is writing argument in tenth grade literature, the student will also demonstrate competency in expository and narrative writing genres. The student will engage in research, timed writings, and the writing process. Instruction in language conventions will occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking, rather than in isolation. The students demonstrate an understanding of speaking and listening for a variety of purposes. THIS COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.06300) This course focuses on a study of World Literature and informational texts; the students develop an understanding of chronological context and the relevance of period structures in literature within world cultures. A focus is to explore the ways the work’s place of origin affects its structure and how the chronology of a literary work affects its meaning. The students develop an understanding of literature as both a culture’s product and a culture-bearer. An exploration of commonalities and differences among works of literature from different times and places in the world is a major component. The students will read across the curriculum to develop academic and personal interests in different subjects. Depending on which grade level this course is taught, the teacher will follow strands from the GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE for that grade level for writing, speaking and listening, and language.
    (23.06400) This course focuses on the major forms of fiction and nonfiction: short story, folktale, poetry, drama, essay, biography, autobiography, memoir, and editorial. A thorough study of the elements of each literary genre is critical (e.g. plot, characterization, purpose, structure, evidence, etc.). Writing is a critical component of this course, emphasizing the following writing genres: argumentative, expository, and narrative. Organizational structures (e.g. cause and effect, definition, and comparison and contrast) are emphasized. Since conventions are essential for reading, writing, and speaking, instruction in language conventions will, therefore, occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking. The students observe and listen critically and respond appropriately to written and oral communication in a variety of genres and media.
    (23.06500) The course focuses on an intensive study of representative works from various literary genres and periods. The focus is on the complexity and thorough analysis of literary works. The students will explore the social and historical values that works reflect and embody. The textual detail and historical context provide the foundation for interpretation: the experience of literature, the interpretation of literature, and the evaluation of literature. Writing to evaluate a literary work involves making and explaining judgments about its artistry and exploring its underlying social and cultural values through analysis, interpretation, and argument (e.g. expository, analytical, and argumentative essays). The writers will develop stylistic maturity: strong vocabulary, sentence variety, and effective use of rhetoric to maintain voice. An AP syllabus will be submitted and approved by College Board.
    (23.06600) The course focuses on the short story, nonfiction, drama, poetry, and the novel (novella) since 1960. The students explore writing by international authors, focusing on various cultures, genders, races, and writing styles. Students write expository, analytical, and response essays. A research component is critical. The students observe and listen critically and respond appropriately to written and oral communication. Conventions are essential for reading, writing, and speaking. Instruction in language conventions will, therefore, occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking rather than in isolation. The students understand and acquire new vocabulary and use it correctly in reading, writing, and speaking.
    (23.06700) The course focuses on world literature and informational texts by and about people of diverse ethnic backgrounds. Students explore themes of linguistic and cultural diversity by comparing, contrasting, analyzing, and critiquing writing styles and universal themes. The students write argumentative, expository, narrative, analytical, and response essays. A research component is critical. The students observe and listen critically and respond appropriately to written and oral communication. Conventions are essential for reading, writing, and speaking. Instruction in language conventions will, therefore, occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking rather than in isolation. The students understand and acquire new vocabulary and use it correctly in reading, writing, and speaking. THIS COURSE MUST REFLECT THE GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.06800) May substitute for 23.05100. This course focuses on the thematic approach to world literature, research, oral and written composition including, but not limited to, major works of American literature and informational texts. The main emphasis is on the effect of history on American literature. Students write expository, analytical, and research based essays. The students gain an understanding of the different genres of literature and writing. The students observe and listen critically and respond appropriately to written and oral communication. Conventions are essential for reading, writing, and speaking. Instruction in language conventions will, therefore, occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking rather than in isolation. The students understand and acquire new vocabulary and use it correctly in reading, writing, and speaking. The course covers all the required American Literature. GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE.
    (23.06900) This course focuses on a thematic approach to world literature and includes reading Latin American works in translation and works written in English from any country other than the United States. The course focuses on world literature by and about people of diverse ethnic backgrounds. Students explore themes of linguistic and cultural diversity by comparing, contrasting, analyzing, and critiquing writing styles and universal themes. The students write expository, argumentative, narrative, analytical, and response essays. A research component is critical. The students observe and listen critically and respond appropriately to written and oral communication. Conventions are essential for reading, writing, and speaking. Instruction in language conventions will, therefore, occur within the context of reading, writing, and speaking rather than in isolation. The students understand and acquire new vocabulary and use it correctly in reading, writing, and speaking.
    (23.07300) May substitute for 23.05100. For course description information please contact International Baccalaureate Organization.
    (23.07310) For course description information please contact International Baccalaureate Organization.
    (23.08100) This course focuses on reinforcement of the GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE based course. The students receive reinforcement in the following strands: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The emphasis is to offer reading skills, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing process activities, and conventions study.
    (23.08200) This course, an extension of the Communication Skills course, focuses on reinforcement of the GEORGIA STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE based course. The student receives reinforcement in the following strands: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Conventions, and Listening, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The emphasis is to offer reading skills, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing process activities, and conventions study. The course enhances reading skills necessary to promote continual development in language arts.
    (23.08300) This course provides fundamental skills development in the five strands of the GSE courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing (according to the GSE literary and informational texts, and writing genres associated with the students’ English course), speaking, and critical thinking.
    (23.08400) This course provides an extension of fundamental skills development addressed in Basic Reading/Writing I in the five strands of the GSE courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing (according to the GSE literary and informational texts, and writing genres associated with the students’ English course), speaking, and critical thinking. Also, test taking skills will be implemented.
    (23.08500) This course enhances the fundamental skills development addressed in Basic Reading/Writing I and II in the five strands of the GSE courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting in order to create an intensive small group environment; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing (according to the GSE literary and informational texts and writing genres associated with the students’ English course), speaking, and critical thinking. Also, test taking skills will be implemented.
    (23.08600) This course enhances an in-depth concentration on the five strands of the GSE GPS courses: Reading Literary texts, Reading Informational texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language. The setup is a language lab setting in order to create an intensive small group environment; the class includes drill and practice opportunities in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, reading opportunities, writing (according to the GSE literary and information texts and writing genres associated with the students’ English course), speaking, and critical thinking. Also, test taking skills will be implemented.

    Health & Physical Education

    (17.01100) Explores the mental, physical and social aspects of life and how each contributes to total health and well-being. Emphasizes safety, nutrition, mental health, substance abuse prevention, disease prevention, environmental health, family life education, health careers, consumer health , and community health.
    (17.01300) Focuses on developing safety habits. Stresses prevention of accidents and injuries, basic life-saving, and first aid techniques.
    (36.01100) Focuses on any combination or variety of team sports, lifetime sports, track and field events, aquatics/water sports, outdoor education experiences, rhythmic/dance, recreational games, gymnastics, and self-defense. Provides basic methods to attain a healthy and active lifestyle.
    (36.02100) Introduces fundamental skills, strategies, and rules associated with team sports such as basketball, volleyball, soccer, softball, baseball, field hockey, lacrosse, team handball, and flag football.
    (36.02400) Introduces basic swimming and safety skills; includes water games and sports.
    (36.02800) Introduces gymnastics, stunts and tumbling; emphasizes safety measures. Uses basic gymnastic equipment such as the balance beam, uneven bars, parallel bars, rings, side horse and horizontal bars.
    (36.05100) Provides instruction in methods to attain a healthy level of physical fitness. Covers how to develop a lifetime fitness program based on a personal fitness assessment and stresses strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, body composition and cardiovascular endurance. Includes fitness principles, nutrition, fad diets, weight control, stress management, adherence strategies and consumer information; promotes self-awareness and responsibility for fitness.
    (36.05200) Provides opportunities to participate in a variety of activities to enhance flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, cardiovascular endurance and body composition. Includes fitness concepts for the development of healthy lifetime habits.
    (36.05300) Provides opportunities to perform choreographic routines to music and to increase strength, cardiovascular and muscular endurance and flexibility. Includes fitness concepts for developing healthy lifetime habits.
    (36.05400) Introduces weight training; emphasizes strength development training and proper lifting techniques. Includes fitness concepts for developing healthy lifetime habits.
    (36.05500)  Provides safe, effective and physiologically sound ways to manage weight and alter metabolism and body composition. Includes consumer information on products, programs and fitness concepts for developing healthy lifetime habits.
    (36.05600) Provides methods to redefine body shape through specific exercises. Covers weight training, conditioning exercises and proper nutrition to improve muscle tone, muscle definition, posture, bodily proportions, overall condition of the body and increase energy levels. Based on the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for fitness and conditioning programs.
    (36.00100) Students perform locomotor movement patterns (e.g. hop, jump, leap) and demonstrates mature patterns when walking and running. A variety of movement skills to use nonlocomotor skills (e.g. bend, twist, turn) while moving and stationary. Weight transfer and balance activities are important in learning to move in relation to others while moving through personal and general space.
    (36.00200) Students perform low level of challenge when participating in locomotor skills (e.g. dance, game, or combination with non-locomotor skills) demonstrating mature form in the hop, jump, and leap. When moving through personal and general space, demonstrates the ability to move in a variety of pathways, in different directions, and at different levels. Several nonlocomotor skills are done in a sequence or in conjunction with locomotor or manipulative skills. Demonstrates ability to direct manipulative objects toward an intended target.
    (36.00300) Students perform mature form in skipping, sliding and galloping when moving through personal and general space. Ability to change directions on teacher command or adapt movement in relation to a partner is expected. Combine non-locomotor movements with manipulative and locomotor patterns in a variety of games and dances. Ability to demonstrate momentary body control during balance and weight transfer is evident. Demonstrates mastery of underhand throwing patterns when performing manipulative skills. Ability to catch an object at a medium level of trajectory is demonstrated in a closed environment (not during game play). Underhand striking skills are being performed but are not at a mature level.
    (36.00400) Students perform mature form in all locomotor and non-locomotor movement patterns while participating in small-sided games, body control (e.g. gymnastics, inline skating and rhythmic activities (e.g. structured dance, jump rope, creative dance). Ability to perform variations of different locomotor skills (e.g. jumping for height and distance; skipping at different speeds). By the end of third grade, students will be able to demonstrate all striking and throwing patterns. Students can catch a moving object from a high trajectory in nongame play environments and are able to catch objects at a medium level trajectory during game play.
    (36.00500) Student gain the ability to combine skills in dynamic and complex situations, demonstrating sequences commonly associated with various sports and activities (e.g. moving to a ball, trapping, dribbling, and then passing it; forward roll, scale (balance), travel and then do a cartwheel). Overhead throwing and striking patterns are mastered and ability to catch or handle objects from and trajectory (low, medium, or high) in simple situations. Ability to move in tempo to slow and fast rhythms.
    (36.00600) Students move through space using any movement pattern in combination with any non-motor skill in complex environments. Movement patterns are demonstrated with consistency and with good form. Some specialized skills, like those associated with sports are refined & used in game play. Ability to hit targets when performing manipulative skills. Ability to combine movement in meaningful ways, creating movement sequences that are smooth and fluid & done to several different rhythmic patterns.
    (36.00700) Students perform motor skills are combined and used in specific game and performance situations. Refine and vary skills learned in elementary years using them to participate in small-sided games, dance, or individual activities.
    (36.00800) Students perform complex combinations of movement specific to game, sport, rhythms, and/or physical activity settings. Specialized skills are adapted to meet the requirements of increasingly complex strategies.
    (36.00900) Students demonstrate the ability to use mature forms for the basic skills and tactics in six of eight categories.
    (17.00100) Mastery of standards through project based learning, technical skills practice, and leadership development activities of the career and technical student organization Future Educators of America (FEA) or Family, Career & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) will provide students with a competitive edge for either entry into the education global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training.
    (17.00200) First grade students will understand how healthy behaviors impact personal health and disease prevention.
    (17.00300) Second grade students will identify concepts related to healthy behaviors and disease prevention.
    (17.00400) Third grade students will identify health enhancing behaviors and describe behaviors related to disease and injury prevention.
    (17.00500) Fourth grade students will describe healthy behaviors to prevent or reduce their risk of injury and/or illness.
    (17.00600) Fifth grade students will describe healthy behaviors to prevent or reduce their risk of injury and/or illness throughout their lifespan.
    (17.00700) Sixth grade students will identify actions and behaviors to prevent injuries, diseases, and disorders.
    (17.00800) Seventh grade students will describe patterns of healthy behaviors to prevent or reduce their risk of injury and /or illness throughout their lifespan.
    (17.00900) Eighth grade students will describe patterns of healthy behaviors to prevent or reduce the risk of injury and/or illness throughout their lifespan. Students will examine the interrelationships of emotional, physical, social, and intellectual health, and how each aspect of health can be impacted by their surroundings.

    Mathematics

    (27.048100) TGSE Foundations of Algebra is a first year high school mathematics course option for students who have completed mathematics in grades 6-8 yet will need substantial support to bolster success in high school mathematics. The course is aimed at students who have reported low standardized test performance in prior grades and/or have demonstrated significant difficulties in previous mathematics classes.Foundations of Algebra will provide many opportunities to revisit and expand the understanding of foundational algebra concepts, will employ diagnostic means to offer focused interventions, and will incorporate varied instructional strategies to prepare students for required high school mathematics courses. The course will emphasize both algebra and numeracy in a variety of contexts including number sense, proportional reasoning, quantitative reasoning with functions, and solving equations and inequalities. Suggested prerequisite: Mathematics GSE Grade 8.
    (27.097100) TGSE Coordinate Algebra is the first course in a sequence of three required high school courses designed to ensure college and career readiness. The course represents a discrete study of algebra with correlated statistics applications and a bridge to the second course through coordinate geometric topics. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of  GSE Grade 8 Mathematics.)
    (27.097200) GSE Analytic Geometry is the second course in a sequence of three required high school courses designed to ensure college and career readiness.  The course embodies a discrete study of geometry analyzed by means of algebraic operations with correlated probability/statistics applications and a bridge to the third course through algebraic topics.  (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of GSE Coordinate Algebra.)
    (27.097300) GSE Advanced Algebra is the third course in a sequence of three required high school courses to ensure college and career readiness. The course is designed to prepare students for fourth course options relevant to their career pursuits. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of GSE Analytic Geometry.)
    (27.097400) GSE Pre-Calculus is a fourth mathematics course option designed to prepare students for Calculus and other college level mathematics courses. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of GSE Advanced Algebra.)
    (27.097500) Accelerated GSE Coordinate Algebra/Analytic Geometry A is the first in a sequence of mathematics courses designed to ensure that students are prepared to take higher-level mathematics courses during their high school carrer, including Advanced Placement Calculus AB, Advanced Placement Calculus BC, and Advanced Placement Statistics. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accelerated GSE Grade 7B/8 Math.)
    (27.097600) Accelerated GSE Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra is the second in a sequence of mathematics courses designed to ensure that students are prepared to take higher-level mathematics courses during their high school career, including Advanced Placement Calculus AB, Advanced Placement Calculus BC, and Advanced Placement Statistics. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accelerated GSE Coordinate Algebra/Analytic Geometry A.)
    (27.097700) Accelerated GSE Pre-Calculus is the third in a sequence of mathematics courses designed to ensure that students are prepared to take higher-level mathematics courses during their high school carrer, including Advanced Placement Calculus AB, Advanced Placement Calculus BC, and Advanced Placement Statistics. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accelerated GSE Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra.)
    (27.098100) Coordinate Algebra Support is a supplemental course that promotes concepts that will be learned in GSE Coordinate Algebra course. This course is designed to supplement the Coordinate Algebra course and therefore, will use the same standards.
    (27.098200) Analytic Geometry Support is a supplemental course that promotes concepts that will be learned in GSE Analytic Geometry course.  This course is designed to supplement the Analytic Geometry course and therefore, will use the same standards.
    (27.098300) Advanced Algebra Support is a supplemental course that promotes concepts that will be learned in GSE Advanced Algebra course.  This course is designed to supplement the Advanced Algebra course and therefore, will use the same` standards.
    (27.07800) Calculus is a fourth mathematics course option that provides a foundation for the study of advanced mathematics. Calculus includes a study of elementary functions, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation, applications of derivatives, integration and applications of the integral. Many of the topics taught in Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus are taught in the Calculus course. Suggested prerequiste:  GSE Pre-Calculus or Accelerated GSE Pre-Calculus.
    (27.07200) Advanced Placement Calculus AB conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Examination.  Follows the College Board syllabus for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Examination.  Covers Advanced Placement Calculus topics such as properties of functions and graphs, limits and continuity, differential and integral calculus. Suggested prerequisite: GSE Pre-Calculus or Accelerated GSE Pre-Calculus.
    (27.07300) Advanced Placement Calculus BC conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Calculus BC Examination. Follows the College Board syllabus for the Advanced Placement Calculus BC Examination.  Covers Advanced Placement Calculus AB topics and includes vector functions, parametric equations, conversions, parametrically defined curves, tangent lines, and sequence and series. Suggested prerequisite: Accelerated GSE Pre-Calculus.
    (27.07400) Advanced Placement Statistics conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Statistics Examination.  Follows the College Board syllabus for the Advanced Placement Statistics Examination. Covers four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. Suggested prerequisite: GSE Advanced Algebra.
    (27.07700) Multi-variable is a fourth-year course option for students who have completed AP Calculus BC. It includes three-dimensional coordinate geometry; matrices and determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices; limits and continuity of functions with two independent variables; partial differentiation; multiple integration; the gradient; the divergence; the curl; Theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss; line integrals; integrals independent of path; and linear first-order differential equations. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Calculus BC)
    (27.08500) Advanced Mathematical Decision Making is a fourth mathematics course option designed to follow the completion of GSE Advanced Algebra or GSE Accelerated GSE Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra. The course will give students further experiences with statistical information and summaries, methods of designing and conducting statistical studies, an opportunity to analyze various voting processes, modeling of data, basic financial decisions, and use network models for making informed decisions. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of GSE Advanced Algebra or GSE Accelerated GSE Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra.)
    (27.08600) Mathematics of Industry and Government is a fourth mathematics course option designed to follow the completion of GSE Advanced Algebra or GSE Accelerated GSE Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra.   Modeled after operations research courses, Mathematics of Industry and Government allows students to explore decision making in a variety of industries such as: Airline – scheduling planes and crews, pricing tickets, taking reservations, and planning the size of the fleet; Pharmaceutical – R& D management; Logistics companies – routing and planning; Lumber and wood products – managing forests and cutting timber; Local government – deployment of emergency services, and Policy studies and regulation – environmental pollution, air traffic safety, AIDS, and criminal justice policy. Students learn to focus on the development of mathematical models that can be used to model, improve, predict, and optimize real-world systems. These mathematical models include both deterministic models such as mathematical programming, routing or network flows and probabilistic models such as queuing, and simulation.  (Prerequisite: Successful completion of GSE Advanced Algebra or GSE Accelerated GSE Analytic Geometry B/Advanced Algebra.)
    (27.08700) Mathematics of Finance is a fourth mathematics course option that concentrates on the mathematics necessary to understand and make informed decisions related to personal finance. The mathematics in the course will be based on many topics in prior courses; however, the specific applications will extend the student’s understanding of when and how to use these topics.
    (27.05240) IB Mathematical Studies SL develops the skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society with an emphasis on the application of mathematics to real-life, everyday situations. Refer to the International Baccalaureate website for more details and a comprehensive course description.
    (27.06120) IB Math I is a course in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program developed by the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program Board. IB Math I is the first year of a comprehensive two-year curriculum that allows its students to fulfill requirements of various national education systems. The model is based on the pattern of no single country but incorporates the best elements of many. IB Math I consists of the study of six core topics: Numbers & Algebra; Functions & Equations; Circular Functions and Trigonometry; Vector Geometry; Statistics & Probability; and Calculus. Students, also, are required to study one of the following subjects: Statistical Methods; Further Calculus; and Further Geometry. A portfolio, consisting of five assignments, is also required. These assignments represent the following three activities: mathematical investigation, extended closed-problem solving and mathematical modeling.  Refer to the International Baccalaureate website for more details and a comprehensive course description.
    (27.06130) IB Math II is the second year of the IB Math I. Students enrolled in this course should have already taken IB Math I. IB Math II is more extensive than IB Math I. Students taking this course will study the six core subjects: Numbers & Algebra; Functions & Equations; Circular Functions and Trigonometry; Vector Geometry Statistics & Probability; and Calculus. They will also be required to study one of the following subjects: Statistical Methods; Further Calculus; and Further Geometry. A portfolio is also required. This is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). Assessment by the IBO is criterion-reference.  Refer to the International Baccalaureate website for more details and a comprehensive course description.
    (27.05200) History of Mathematics is a one-semester elective course option for students who have completed AP Calculus or are taking AP Calculus  concurrently.  It traces the development of major branches of mathematics throughout history, specifically algebra, geometry, number theory, and methods of proofs, how that development was influenced by the needs of various cultures, and how the mathematics in turn influenced culture.  The course extends the numbers and counting, algebra, geometry, and data analysis and probability strands from previous courses, and included a new history strand. Suggested prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or AP Calculus BC. This course may be taken concurrently with AP Calculus.

    Science

    (02.47500) Course meets fourth science requirement. This course is designed as a supplemental or support course for agricultural career pathways such as Agriscience. The course introduces the major areas of biotechnology research and applications. It presents problem solving lessons and introductory skills and knowledge in biotechnology. The course prepares students for further study in biotechnology while giving them hands-on examples of real world applications in biotechnology. Classroom and laboratory activities are supplemented through supervised agricultural experiences and leadership programs and activities.
    (25.56900) Course meets fourth science requirement. This course further introduces students to the fundamentals of biotechnology. Included in this course are additional techniques in biotechnology. Additionally, a deeper level of laboratory safety and applications in biotechnology is emphasized. The knowledge and skills gained in this course will provide students with a greater understanding of biotechnology and prepare students for skill application in a workplace setting.
    (25.57000) Course meets fourth science requirement. This is the second course in the career pathway that introduces students to the broad understanding of the fundamentals of biotechnology and the impact on society. The knowledge and skills in this course provides a basic overview of current trends and careers in biotechnology, with an emphasis on basic laboratory skills, along with the business, regulatory, and ethical aspects of biotechnology. The prerequisite for the course is Introduction to Healthcare Science Technology.
    (26.01800) May substitute for 26.01200. This course is offered at two levels, the higher level (HL) and the standard level (SL). At the HL level the course is taken over two years. Students taken the course at the SL level must take it on one year. Students at both levels study have the following five core topics; cells, the chemistry of life, genetics, ecology and evolution, and human health and physiology. Optional course topics for students at both HL and SL are evolution, neurobiology and behavior, applied plant and animal science, and ecology and conservation. Students at SL also have the option of diet and human nutrition, physiology of exercise and cells and energy. Students at SL are required to study any two options with a duration each of 15 hours. Students at HL are required to study any two options with duration each of 22.5 hours. (IBO: A Guide to the IB Diploma Programme for Universities & Colleges).
    (26.01900) This course is the continuation of HL International Baccalaureate Biology I. Students at HL must complete additional studies in the following areas: nucleic acids and proteins, cell respiration and photosynthesis, genetics, human reproduction, defense against infectious disease, nerves, muscles and movement, excretion, and plant science. Optional course topics are evolution, neurobiology and behavior, human physiology, applied plant and animal science, and ecology and conservation. Students at HL are required to study any two options with duration each of 22.5 hours.
    (26.03100) Students are presented basic concepts of plant biology, focusing on the plant characteristics, unity and diversity, plant growth, plant reproduction, and photosynthesis. Students discuss current ideas in agriculture, horticulture, medicine, biotechnology, ecology, conservation, and environmental issues. Students investigate botany concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.
    (26.05100) This course focuses on archaebacteria, prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and viruses. Students will study historical microbiology, growth and identification of bacteria, control of microbial growth, pathogenic microbiology, food and dairy microbiology, and soil and water microbiology. Students will utilize scientific inquiry to solve problems related to disease, bioterrorism, biotechnology and ecology.
    (26.06100) This course focus in the study of the distribution and abundance of life and interactions between and among organisms and their environment, including the impact of human activities on the natural world. It draws on elements from biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and the social sciences. This curriculum is lab and field based. Whenever possible careers related to ecology and relevant case studies should be emphasized.
    (26.06110) The Environmental Science curriculum is designed to extend student investigations that began in grades K-8. This curriculum is extensively performance, lab and field based. It integrates the study of many components of our environment, including the human impact on our planet. Instruction should focus on student data collection and analysis. Some concepts are global; in those cases, interpretation of global data sets from scientific sources is strongly recommended. It would be appropriate to utilize resources on the Internet for global data sets and interactive models. Chemistry, physics, mathematical, and technological concepts should be integrated throughout the course. Whenever possible, careers related to environmental science should be emphasized.
    (26.06200) AP Environmental Science is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. The following themes provide a foundation for the structure of the AP Environmental Science course: (1) Science is a process, (2) Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes, (3) The Earth itself is one interconnected system, (4) Humans alter natural systems, (5) Environmental problems have a cultural and social context, and (6) Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems. (Advanced Placement Course Description, May 1997. The College Board.)
    (26.06300) This course is offered just at the standard level (SL). The course provides students with a coherent perspective on the environment that is essentially scientific, and above all enables them to adopt an informed and responsible stance on the wide range of environmental issues they will inevitably come to face. Students are required to study four broad topics; systems and models, ecosystems, global cycles and physical systems, and human population and carrying capacity. Students must complete additional study in analyzing ecosystems plus one choice from either impacts of resources exploitation, conservation and biodiversity and/or pollution management.
    (26.06310) Through studying environmental systems and societies (ES&S) students will be provided with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. The minimum prescribed number of hours is 150. The course is offered only at standard level (SL). External assessment consists of two written papers and provides opportunities for students to demonstrate an understanding through the application, use, synthesis, analysis and evaluation of environmental issues, information, concepts, methods, techniques and explanations. Internal assessment accounts for 20% of the final assessment and is comprised of a series of practical and fieldwork activities. This assessment component enables students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge, and to pursue their personal interests, without the time limitations and other constraints that are associated with written examinations.
    (26.07100) This is a laboratory based course that will survey the nine major phyla of the Kingdom Animalia. Morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and physiology of porifera, cnidaria, platyhelminthes, nematode, rotifer, annelid, bryozoa, mollusca, arthropods, echinodemata, hemichordate, chordat, agnatha, chondrichthyes, osteichthyes, amphibian, reptilian, aves, and mammalian will be investigated through comparative studies done during laboratory observations and dissections. Furthermore, students will compare and contrast methods used by organisms from different phyla to accomplish basic life processes.
    (26.07300) The human anatomy and physiology curriculum is designed to continue student investigations that began in grades K-8 and high school biology. This curriculum is extensively performance and laboratory based. It integrates the study of the structures and functions of the human body, however rather than focusing on distinct anatomical and physiological systems (respiratory, nervous, etc.) instruction should focus on the essential requirements for life. Areas of study include organization of the body; protection, support and movement; providing internal coordination and regulation; processing and transporting; and reproduction, growth and development. Chemistry should be integrated throughout anatomy and not necessarily taught as a standalone unit. Whenever possible, careers related to medicine, research, health-care and modern medical technology should be emphasized throughout the curriculum. Case studies concerning diseases, disorders and ailments (i.e. real-life applications) should be emphasized.
    (40.02100) This course will provide the student with an introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy, the origin and history of the Universe and the formation of the Earth and the solar system. Students will compare the Earth’s properties with those of the other planets and explore how the heavens have influenced human thought and action. The course gives a description of astronomical phenomena using the laws of physics. The course treats many standard topics including planets, stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, black holes to more esoteric questions concerning the origin of the universe and its evolution and fate. Although largely descriptive, the course will occasionally require the use of sophomore-high level mathematics. Laboratory exercises include experiments in light properties, measurement of radiation from celestial sources, and observations at local observatories and/or planetariums.
    (40.04100) This course will provide the student with basic understanding of weather and climate. The student will develop an understanding of the structure and function of the atmosphere including the dynamics between its matter and energy and their effect on weather and climate. The students will study the major components of weather such as temperature, humidity, pressure, precipitation, and winds and the interactions between them. The course will address also aspects of air pollution and global climate change and provide them with an understanding of basic weather forecasting.
    (40.05100) The Chemistry curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in chemistry. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as the structure of atoms, structure and properties of matter, characterization of the properties that describe solutions and the nature of acids and bases, and the conservation and interaction of energy and matter. Students investigate chemistry concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.
    (40.05200) This course is design to enhance the concepts that were cover on Chemistry I. Chemistry II students acquire a deeper of understanding of qualitative and quantitative analysis and are introduced to organic chemistry.
    (40.05300) This course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. Students should attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. AP chemistry students should study topics related to the structure and states of matter (atomic theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, gases laws, kinetic molecular theory, liquids and solids and solutions), chemical reactions (reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics), and descriptive chemistry (chemical reactivity, products of chemical reactions, relationships in the periodic table, and organic chemistry). To develop the requisite intellectual and laboratory skills, AP Chemistry students need adequate classroom and laboratory time. It is expected that a minimum of 290 minutes per week will be allotted for an AP Chemistry course. Of that time, a minimum of 90 minutes per week, preferably in one session, should be spent in the lab. The AP Chemistry course is designed to be taken after the completion of a first course in high school chemistry. In addition, the recommended mathematics prerequisite for an AP Chemistry class is the successful completion of a second-year algebra course. It is highly desirable that a student have a course in secondary school physics and a four-year college preparatory program in mathematics. (College Board course description September 2007)
    (40.05500) Standard level designed to introduce students to the theories and practical techniques involved in the composition, characterization, and transformation of substances. As the central science, the chemical principles investigated underpin both the physical world in which we live and all biological systems
    (40.05600) Higher level designed to introduce students to the theories and practical techniques involved in the composition, characterization, and transformation of substances. As the central science, the chemical principles investigated underpin both the physical world in which we live and all biological systems
    (40.06400) Earth Systems Science is designed to continue student investigations that began in K-8 Earth Science and Life Science curricula and investigate the connections among Earth’s systems through Earth history. These systems – the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere – interact through time to produce the Earth’s landscapes, ecology, and resources. This course develops the explanations of phenomena fundamental to the sciences of geology and physical geography, including the early history of the Earth, plate tectonics, landform evolution, the Earth’s geologic record, weather and climate, and the history of life on Earth. Instruction should focus on inquiry and development of scientific explanations, rather than mere descriptions of phenomena. Case studies, laboratory exercises, maps, and data analysis should be integrated into units. Special attention should be paid to topics of current interest (e.g., recent earthquakes, tsunamis, global warming, price of resources) and to potential careers in the geosciences.
    (40.07100) This course introduces the students to the study of the ocean composition and structure, the dynamics of energy flow within the ocean system, and the impact of human interaction with the ocean systems. The basic concepts of physical, chemical, geologic and biological oceanography are addressed by discussions on marine mineral resources, ocean energy, living resources of the sea, marine pollution and ocean management. Student will acquire practical laboratory and field experiences through the reading of charts, making basic measurements of seawater chemistry, examination of coastal geology, wave and beach processes, and marine organisms and habitats.
    (40.08100) The Physics curriculum is designed to continue student investigations of the physical sciences that began in grades K-8 and provide students the necessary skills to be proficient in physics. This curriculum includes more abstract concepts such as interactions of matter and energy, velocity, acceleration, force, energy, momentum, and charge. This course introduces the students to the study of the correction to Newtonian physics given by quantum mechanics and relativity. Students investigate physics concepts through experience in laboratories and field work using the processes of inquiry.
    (40.08200) This course is design to enhance the concepts that were cover on Physics I. Physics II students acquire a deeper of understanding of circular and angular motion, thermodynamics, electric and magnetic fields, particle physics, nuclear physics, and special relativity. The students investigate phenomena using the process of inquiry.
    (40.08310) AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills.
    (40.08320) AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills.
    (40.08410) This course should provide instruction in each of the following six content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Laboratory experiences should be included as part of the instruction. Students taken this course should be able to: design experiments; observe and measure real phenomena; organize, display, and critically analyze data; analyze sources of error and determine uncertainties in measurement; draw inferences from observations and data; and communicate results, including suggested ways to improve experiments and proposed questions for further study. (College Board course description September 2007)
    (40.08420) This course should provide instruction in each of the following five content areas: electrostatics; conductors, capacitors, and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism. Laboratory experiences should be included as part of the instruction. Students taken this course should be able to: design experiments; observe and measure real phenomena; organize, display, and critically analyze data; analyze sources of error and determine uncertainties in measurement; draw inferences from observations and data; and communicate results, including suggested ways to improve experiments and proposed questions for further study. (College Board course description September 2007)
    (40.08500) This course is designed to introduce students to the laws of physics, the experimental skill required in physics, and the social and historical aspects of physics as an evolving body of human knowledge about nature. The course is offered at both higher level (HL) and standard level (SL). Students at HL and SL study six topics: physical measurement, mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics. Optional course topics for students at both HL and SL, from which the HL student may choose two, while the SL student may choose two from this list as well as the further options list. The optional course topics are: biomedical physics, the history and development of physics, astrophysics, relativity, and optics. The further options for students at SL include: mechanics extension, quantum physics and nuclear physics, and energy extension. Students at SL are required to study any two options with duration each of 15 hours. Students at HL are required to study any two options with duration each of 22.5 hours. (IBO: A Guide to the IB Diploma Programme for Universities & Colleges).
    (40.08600) This course is the continuation of HL International Baccalaureate Physics I. Students at HL must complete additional studies in the following areas: measurement and uncertainties, mechanics, thermal physics, wave phenomena, electromagnetism, and quantum physics and nuclear physics. Optional course topics are biomedical physics, the history and development of physics, astrophysics, relativity, and optics. Students at HL are required to study any two options with duration each of 22.5 hours.
    (40.09100) (Post AP Science typically for Magnet students) This course will provide highly motivated and qualified students the skills necessary for advanced science research.  Students will read professional scientific literature and translate this information into applicable research topics and projects.  Advanced knowledge and skills acquired from AP Biology, or AP Chemistry, or AP Physics will be applied to topics explored in this course.  Students will participate in laboratory research either by developing and executing their own research project or by participating in an on-going research project with a science mentor.  The target population will be students who have completed honors courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and at least one AP Science course and have made a commitment to advanced collegiate studies in science.  Culmination of this course will be a scientific paper which will be presented to a faculty/community/research panel.
    (40.09210) Students taken the Research I will develop projects that are mostly suggested or required by their teacher. It is expected that this students will received strong support from their teacher and their research projects could be completed on a time frame of weeks. Presentation of the projects developed at this level will happen mostly in a classroom setting or school site science fair.
    (40.09220) Students taken the Research II course will develop projects based on their interests. These projects may be related to topics that they are covering in any of their science courses or could expand on those ideas. It is expected that the students will received some support from their teachers but they will be working mostly independently. Projects at this level could be completed on a time frame of weeks to months. Presentations of the projects developed at this level could take place at regional or state science fair competitions for example.
    (40.09230) Students taken the Research III course will develop projects based on their interests. Projects at this level would be original in nature and will investigate students’ ideas to solve a particular problem. It is expected that the students will work with someone outside the school setting as they work towards the solution of their problem. This type of projects may take the whole length of the course to be completed. Students’ completing these projects is expected to present their solutions to the appropriate interests groups (i.e. a particular company, an interest group, etc.) or on settings like the Best Robotics competitions, Siemens, the High School Engineering Competition, etc.
    (40.09240) Students taken the Research IV will develop projects based on their interests. Projects at this level would be original in nature and will investigate students’ ideas to solve a particular problem. It is expected that the students will work with a university professor or in an industrial setting to find the answer to their research question. This type of projects may take the whole length of the course to be completed. Students’ completing these projects is expected to present their solutions to the appropriate interests groups (i.e. a particular company, an interest group, etc.) or on settings like the Best Robotics competitions, Siemens, the High School Engineering Competition, etc.
    (40.09300) In this course students will learn the scientific protocols for analyzing a crime scene, how to use chemical and physical separation methods to isolate and identify materials, how to analyze biological evidence and the criminal use of tools, including impressions from firearms, tool marks, arson, and explosive evidence.

    Social Studies

    (45.05700) The government course provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. Students examine the philosophical foundations of the United States government and how that philosophy developed. Students also examine the structure and function of the United States government and its relationship to states and citizens.
    (45.07110) The world geography course provides students with an analytical view of how geographic factors have and continue to influence human behavior on the earth. Students will examine how the
    physical and cultural geographic factors contribute to varying levels of cooperation within the major world regions. Additionally, students will examine the importance that political, environmental, and economic factors have in a region’s development.
    (45.08300)  The high school world history course provides students with a comprehensive, intensive study of major events and themes in world history. Students begin with a study of the earliest civilizations worldwide and continue to examine major developments and themes in all regions of the world. The course culminates in a study of change and continuity and globalization at the beginning of the 21st century.
    (45.08100) The high school United States history course provides students with a survey of major events and themes in United States history. The course begins with English settlement and concludes with significant developments in the early 21st Century.
    (45.06100) Economics is the study of how individuals, businesses, and governments make decisions about the allocation of scarce resources. The economics course provides students with a basic foundation in the field of economics. The course has five sections: fundamental concepts, microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, and personal finance. In each area, students are introduced to major concepts and themes concerning that aspect of economics. These sections and the standards and elements therein may be taught in any order or sequence.
    (45.01500) Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. It is a unique science that often necessitates the use of special measurements and research methods. The course has four sections: psychological foundations and research, biological foundations, change in behavior and cognition, and variability of behavior among individual and groups.
    (45.01200) Analyzes current issues and influences that are related to these issues and examines how decisions are made concerning those issues. Integrates and reinforces social studies skills.
    (45.03100) This course is an introductory study in sociology, the study of social behavior and the organization of human society. Students will learn about the historical development of the field of sociology and the procedures for conducting research in sociology. Students will also learn the importance and role of culture, social structure, socialization, and social change in today’s society.
    (45.03200) Examines the diversity of American society; focuses on various ethnic groups that make up the American population. Covers cultural orientation, contributions of each group and cultural perspectives of each group. Integrates and reinforces social studies skills.
    (45.0770) Conforms to the College Board topics for Advanced Placement Human Geography.
    (45.05200) May substitute for 45.05700. Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics Examination. Covers federalism, separation of powers, influences on the formulation and adoption of the Constitution, political beliefs, political parties and elections, interest groups, institutions and policy processes and civil liberties and civil rights.
    (45.05300) Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics Examination. Covers sources of public authority and political power, society and politics, citizen and state, political framework, political change and an introduction to comparative politics.
    (45.06200) May substitute for 45.06100. Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Examination. Covers basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination and international economics and growth.
    (45.06300) May substitute for 45.06100. Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Microeconomics Examination. Covers basic economic concepts, the nature and functions of product markets, factor markets and efficiency, equity and the role of government.
    (45.08110) May substitute for 45.08300. Conforms to the College Board topics for Advanced Placement World History. Includes study of cultural, political, social and economic history. Stresses research and writing skills.
    (45.08200) May substitute for 45.08100. Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement United States History Examination. Covers discovery and settlement, Colonial Society, the American Revolution, Constitution and the New Republic, Age of Jefferson, Nationalism, Sectionalism, Territorial Expansion, Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrialization, Progressive Era, World War I, Depression, New Deal, World War II, The Cold War, through modern times.
    (45.08400) Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement European History Examination. Covers intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history and social and economic history.
    (45.01600) Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Introductory Psychology Examination. Covers methods, approaches and the history of psychology as a science, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, developmental psychology, personality, testing and individual differences, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychological disorders and social psychology.
    (45.08700) May substitute for 45.08100. Emphasizes the comprehensive study of the colonization, development, independence and formative periods in United States history during the period of 1500 to 1995 with the emphasis on 1800 to 1995. Examines the social, political and cultural trends from a regional perspective.
    (45.08800) Conforms to the International Baccalaureate topics for study for 20th Century History.

    World Language

    (60.01100) Introduces the French language; emphasizes all skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an integrated way. Includes how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics and to develop an understanding of French-speaking cultures.
    (60.01110) Enhances skills in French and provides opportunities to increase levels of proficiency in all skill areas. Emphasizes a deeper understanding of French culture through advanced reading and advanced level topics for discussion and composition.
    (60.01120) This is not a first or second year course. The IB Second Language courses Standard Level offers student an enriched study of language, literature, and culture with relevance to international societies.  Students review all language concepts and study representative writers in the original language independently and in groups.  Students are immersed in a culturally rich environment in which they actively participate.  They are assessed on effective and accurate communication.  Tasks of the advanced language learner include use of the language within and outside of school, information and communication via technology, involvement in activities for personal enrichment and career development – all working to produce a lifelong learner. To achieve an appreciation and understanding of cultures, students will partake in interactive endeavors and a culturally rich environments where their ability to communicate effectively and accurately plays an essential role.  Students will be exposed to topics through thematic units and will demonstrate understanding and competence by presenting individual and group projects.
    (60.01130) This is not a first or second year course. The IB Second Language courses Higher Level offers students an enriched study of language, literature, and culture with relevance to international societies.  Students review all language concepts and study representative writers in the original language independently and in groups.  Students are immersed in a culturally rich environment in which they actively participate.  They are assessed on effective and accurate communication.  Tasks of the advanced language learner include use of the language within and outside of school, information and communication via technology, involvement in activities for personal enrichment and career development – all working to produce a lifelong learner. To achieve an appreciation and understanding of cultures, students will partake in higher-level interactive endeavors and culturally rich environments where their ability to communicate effectively and accurately plays an essential role.  Students will be exposed to topics through thematic units and will demonstrate understanding and competence by presenting individual and group projects.
    (60.01140) IB World Language abinitio 1 courses emphasize the development of the student’s linguistic competence in a second language. Students explore the target through examining a wide variety of media written in the language. Newspapers and magazines, films, plays and novels all aid in the growth of the student’s linguistic abilities and allow students to gain an appreciation of the culture(s) in which the language is spoken.
    (60.01150) IB World Language abinitio 2 courses further develop the student’s linguistic competence in a second language. Students explore the target through examining a wide variety of media written in the language. Newspapers and magazines, films, plays and novels all aid in the growth of the student’s linguistic abilities and allow students to gain an appreciation of the culture(s) in which the language is spoken.
    (60.01200) Enhances Level One skills in French and provides opportunities to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, and to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics. Provides opportunities to increase understanding of French-speaking cultures.
    (60.01300) Enhances Level Two skills in French and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in previous topics and introduces new topics; offers further opportunities to increase understanding of French-speaking cultures.
    (60.01400) Enhances Level Three skills in French and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued language development through exploration of familiar and unfamiliar topics and provides opportunities to develop a broader and more extensive understanding of French-speaking cultures.
    (60.01500)  Enhances Level Four skills in French, provides opportunities to increase levels of proficiency in all skill areas and to deepen understanding of French-speaking cultures.
    (60.01700) Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement French Language Examination. Emphasizes using the language for active communication. Stresses the ability to understand French in various contexts, to develop a vocabulary sufficient for reading newspapers, magazines, literary texts, and other nontechnical writing and to express oneself in speech and in writing coherently, fluently and accurately.
    (60.07100) Introduces the Spanish language; emphasizes all skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Includes how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics and to develop an understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures.
    (60.07200) Enhances Level One skills in Spanish and provides opportunities to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics and to increase understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures.
    (60.07300) Enhances Level Two skills in Spanish and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in previous topics and introduces new topics; offers further opportunities to increase understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures.
    (60.07400) Enhances Level Three skills in Spanish and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued language development through exploration of familiar and unfamiliar topics and provides opportunities for a broader and more extensive understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures.
    (60.07500) Enhances Level Four skills in Spanish, provides opportunities to increase levels of proficiency in all skill areas and to deepen understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures.
    (60.07600) Enhances Level Five skills in Spanish, provides opportunities to increase levels of proficiency in all skill areas and to deepen understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures. Offers further opportunities to study Spanish literature and advanced level topics.
    (60.07700) Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language Examination. Emphasizes the ability to comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish, to acquire the vocabulary and grasp of structure to read newspapers, magazines and Hispanic literature, to compose expository passages and to speak accurately and fluently.
    (60.07900) Designed for Heritage Language Learners of Spanish, this course can accommodate a wide range of Heritage language learners, from those who are minimally functional (can comprehend Spanish but are not able to speak fluently, read or write) to those who are more proficient and literate in Spanish. The recommended entrance requirement for the beginning level is at the Intermediate-Mid level of proficiency in listening comprehension on the ACTFL scale. It is not necessary that students speak at the Intermediate level prior to entering the course. This course will develop reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. The student will also develop an awareness and understanding of Hispanic cultures, such as language variations, customs, geography and current events.
    (60.07910) Designed for Heritage Language Learners of Spanish, this course can accommodate a wide range of Heritage language learners, from those who are somewhat functional (can comprehend spoken Spanish but speak haltingly and need improvement in reading and/or writing) to those who are more proficient and literate in Spanish. The recommended entrance requirement is at the Intermediate-High level of proficiency in listening comprehension on the ACTFL scale and an Intermediate-Mid level of proficiency in reading, writing and speaking. This course will continue to develop reading, writing, speaking and listening skills and will promote a deeper understanding of the Hispanic cultures, such as language variations, customs, geography, history, and current events.
    (60.08110) The AP® Spanish Literature and Culture course is designed to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that of an introductory college course in literature written in Spanish. The course introduces students to the formal study of a representative body of texts from Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Hispanic literature. The course provides opportunities for students to demonstrate their proficiency in Spanish across the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and the five goal areas (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities) outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The overarching aims of the course are to provide students with ongoing and varied opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language skills — with special attention to critical reading and analytical writing — and to encourage them to reflect on the many voices and cultures included in a rich and diverse body of literature written in Spanish. The inclusion of “and Culture” in the title of the course reflects a purposeful alignment of the course to a standards-based Spanish curriculum. In particular, the course reflects a meaningful integration of the cultures, connections, and comparisons goal areas of the Standards. Emphasis is placed on approaching the study of literature through global, historical and contemporary cultural contexts. Teachers and students are encouraged to make interdisciplinary connections and explore linguistic and cultural comparisons. A key objective of the course is to encourage students not only to understand and retell the content of the texts they read but also to relate that content to literary, historical, sociocultural, and geopolitical contexts in Spanish.
    (60.07170) IB World Language abinitio 1 courses emphasize the development of the student’s linguistic competence in a second language. Students explore the target through examining a wide variety of media written in the language. Newspapers and magazines, films, plays and novels all aid in the growth of the student’s linguistic abilities and allow students to gain an appreciation of the culture(s) in which the language is spoken.
    (60.07180) IB World Language abinitio 2 courses further develop the student’s linguistic competence in a second language. Students explore the target through examining a wide variety of media written in the language. Newspapers and magazines, films, plays and novels all aid in the growth of the student’s linguistic abilities and allow students to gain an appreciation of the culture(s) in which the language is spoken.
    (60.07810) “Language B Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL) are language acquisition courses for students with some previous experience of learning the language. While studying the language, students also explore the culture(s) connected with it. Higher and standard levels are differentiated by the recommended teaching hours, the depth of syllabus coverage, the required study or literature at HL, and the level of difficulty and requirements of the assessment tasks and criteria. The course is organized into themes. Three core themes are required: communication and media, global issues, and social relationships. In addition, at both HL and SL, teachers select two more themes from five options provided. Finally, two works of literature are studied at HL only.
    (60.07820) Language B Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL) are language acquisition courses for students with some previous experience of learning the language. While studying the language, students also explore the culture(s) connected with it. Higher and standard levels are differentiated by the recommended teaching hours, the depth of syllabus coverage, the required study or literature at HL, and the level of difficulty and requirements of the assessment tasks and criteria. The course is organized into themes. Three core themes are required: communication and media, global issues, and social relationships. In addition, at both HL and SL, teachers select two more themes from five options provided. Finally, two works of literature are studied at HL only.
    (61.01100) Introduces the German language; emphasizes all skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an integrated way. Includes how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics and to develop an understanding of German-speaking cultures.
    (61.01200)  Enhances Level One skills in German and provides opportunities to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in how to greet and take leave of someone, to ask and respond to basic questions, to speak and read within a range of carefully selected topics and to increase understanding of German-speaking cultures.
    (61.01300) Enhances Level Two skills in German and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued practice in previous topics and introduces new topics; offers further opportunities to increase understanding of German-speaking cultures.
    (61.01400)  Enhances Level Three skills in German and provides further opportunities to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in an integrated way. Provides continued language development through exploration of familiar and unfamiliar topics and provides opportunities for a broader and more extensive understanding of German-speaking cultures.
    (61.01500) Enhances Level Four skills in German, provides opportunities to increase levels of proficiency in all skill areas and to increase understanding of German-speaking cultures.
    (61.01600) Enhances Level Five skills in German, provides opportunities to increase levels of proficiency in all skill areas and to deepen understanding of German-speaking cultures. Offers further opportunities to study German literature and advanced level topics.
    (61.01700) Conforms to College Board topics for the Advanced Placement German Language Examination. Emphasizes having a strong command of vocabulary and structure, understanding spoken German, reading newspapers and magazines, contemporary fiction and non-technical writing without using a dictionary and expressing ideas orally and in writing accurately and fluently.
    (61.04100) Introduces students to the Latin language and ancient Roman civilization. Emphasizes the ability to write simple Latin phrases and to understand simple Latin passages presented orally and in writing.
    (61.04120) This is not a first or second year course. The IB Second Language courses Standard Level offers student an enriched study of language, literature, and culture with relevance to international societies.  Students review all language concepts and study representative writers in the original language independently and in groups.  Students are immersed in a culturally rich environment in which they actively participate.  They are assessed on effective and accurate communication.  Tasks of the advanced language learner include use of the language within and outside of school, information and communication via technology, involvement in activities for personal enrichment and career development – all working to produce a lifelong learner. To achieve an appreciation and understanding of cultures, students will partake in interactive endeavors and a culturally rich environments where their ability to communicate effectively and accurately plays an essential role.  Students will be exposed to topics through thematic units and will demonstrate understanding and competence by presenting individual and group projects.
    (61.04130) This is not a first or second year course. The IB Second Language courses Higher Level offers students an enriched study of language, literature, and culture with relevance to international societies.  Students review all language concepts and study representative writers in the original language independently and in groups.  Students are immersed in a culturally rich environment in which they actively participate.  They are assessed on effective and accurate communication.  Tasks of the advanced language learner include use of the language within and outside of school, information and communication via technology, involvement in activities for personal enrichment and career development – all working to produce a lifelong learner. To achieve an appreciation and understanding of cultures, students will partake in higher-level interactive endeavors and culturally rich environments where their ability to communicate effectively and accurately plays an essential role.  Students will be exposed to topics through thematic units and will demonstrate understanding and competence by presenting individual and group projects.
    (61.04200) Enhances Level One skills and provides opportunities to translate longer, more challenging passages. Emphasizes how ancient Roman language and civilization has influenced Western language and civilization.
    (61.04300) Enhances previously learned skills and introduces original works by Latin authors. The works of the authors may be selected in any order for courses designated at the third, fourth, and fifth year levels. The authors whose works are studied are Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Ovid, and Vergil. Selected works from authors such as Aulus Gellius, Juvenal, Livy, Martial, Cornelius, Nepos, Plautus, Sallust, Pliny, as well as authors from later Latin, can be included. Explores the political, economic, social characteristics represented in the works studied and examines the various writing styles of the authors.
    (61.04400) Enhances previously learned skills and introduces original works by Latin authors. The works of the authors may be selected in any order for courses designated at the third, fourth, and fifth year levels. The authors whose works are studied are Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Ovid, and Vergil. Selected works from authors such as Aulus Gellius, Juvenal, Livy, Martial, Cornelius, Nepos, Plautus, Sallust, Pliny, as well as authors from later Latin, can be included. Explores the political, economic, social characteristics represented in the works studied and examines the various writing styles of the authors.
    (66.01000) Less commonly taught language. The Level I language course focuses on the development of communicative competence in the target language and understanding of the culture(s) of the people who speak the language. It assumes that the students have minimal or no prior knowledge of the language and culture. This course may be taught over two years (e.g., middle school programs), over one year (e.g., traditional high school programs), or during one semester (e.g., 4 x 4 block schedule). The major means of communication between students and instructors will be in the target language. Because students may begin formal language learning at various stages of their cognitive development, teachers must adjust vocabulary and content to reflect developmentally appropriate interests. An important component of language classes is the use of the language beyond the classroom in the real world. The integration of technology is an important tool in accessing authentic information in the target language and in providing students the opportunity to interact with native speakers. By the end of Level I, students will exhibit Novice-Mid level proficiency in speaking and writing and Novice-High level proficiency in listening, and reading (ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines, 1999).
    (66.02000) The Level II language course focuses on the continued development of communicative competence in the target language and understanding of the culture(s) of the people who speak the language. It assumes that the students have successfully completed a Level I course or are at a Novice-Mid level of proficiency. Students begin to show a greater level of accuracy when using basic language structures, and they are exposed to more complex features of the language. They continue to focus on communicating about their immediate world and daily life activities, read material on familiar topics, and write short, directed compositions. The major means of communication between students and instructors will be in the target language. Because students may begin formal language learning at various stages of their cognitive development, teachers must adjust vocabulary and content in order to reflect developmentally appropriate interests. This course may be taught over two years (e.g., middle school programs), over one year (e.g., traditional high school programs), or during one semester (e.g., 4 x 4 block schedule). An important component of language classes is the use of the language beyond the classroom in the real world. The integration of technology is an important tool in accessing authentic information in the target language and in providing students the opportunity to interact with native speakers. By the end of Level II, students will exhibit Novice-Mid level proficiency in speaking and writing and Novice-High level proficiency in listening and reading (ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines, 1999).